It's Fall my Favorite time of year

Author: Miranda /

Hello all my faithful followers, I am sorry to have left for so long! I had decided it was time to take a break from the computer and that turned into a great long summer :) Now I am back and will do my best to keep everyone updated on what I am working on, share some of my favorite things and share little stories about my family.

Today I wanted to share some information about an illness that we don't hear a lot about with all the flu and H1N1 talk going around but is still out there. Recently my 6 yr old son was diagnosed with Mono. Now I didn't know much about Mono as I don't remember having it growing up, but the more I talked to people the more I realized i needed to do some research. Mono can effect people differently. For example Connor isn't tired, worn out or cranky, but he had the fever and extremely sore throat and nasty cough, I am very relieved that the doctor tested for Mono. He originally tested simply to rule it out and found out that was indeed what he had. Here is some informative information I found on familydoctor.org.

Mononucleosis (often called "mono") is an infection caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. Symptoms of mono include:
Fever
Sore throat
Fatigue
Weakness
Swollen glands in your neck and armpits
Loss of appetite
Night sweats
Symptoms in young children are generally mild, while symptoms in adolescents and young adults tend to be more severe.

Mono is not spread as easily as some other viruses, such as the common cold. The mono virus is found in saliva and mucus. It is usually passed from one person to another through kissing, which is why it is often called the kissing disease. However, mono can also be passed through exposure to a cough, sneeze or through sharing food utensils (such as drinking glasses, spoons and forks) with someone who has mono. Signs of mono usually develop 4 to 6 weeks after you're exposed to the virus. Generally, people only get mono once. It's most common among people 15 to 35 years old.

Sometimes there can be complications. The main complication with mono is the enlargement of the spleen. The spleen is like a large gland. It's located in the upper part of your abdomen on the left side. It helps filter your blood. In severe cases of mono, the spleen can rupture (tear open).Although a ruptured spleen is rare in people who have mono, it's wise to be aware of the signs and call your doctor right away if you notice any of them. Signs of a ruptured spleen include sharp pain in the left upper part of your abdomen (under the left chest), feeling lightheaded, feeling confused, blurred vision and fainting.

There is no cure for mono.But the virus will go away on its own. Symptoms usually last about 4 weeks.

The main goal of treatment is to relieve your symptoms. The following list includes tips on treatment:
Rest. Sleep helps your body fight infection.
Drink plenty of fluids. They help prevent dehydration.
If you have a sore throat, gargle with salt water, or suck on throat lozenges, hard candy or flavored frozen desserts (such as Popsicles).
You may want to take acetaminophen (one brand name: Tylenol) or ibuprofen (some brand names: Advil, Motrin, Nuprin) to relieve pain and fever. Do not give aspirin to children. Aspirin should be avoided because it has been associated with a disease called Reye's syndrome in children. Reye's syndrome is a serious illness that can lead to death.

Avoid sports, physical activities or exercise of any kind until your doctor tells you it's safe. Moving around too much puts you at risk of rupturing your spleen, especially if it is enlarged. You need to avoid physical activities and contact sports for about 3 to 4 weeks after you've had mono.

So yeah it looks like a lot but this was a great summary and very informative. So please if you or your child has any symptoms make sure your doctor checks for Mono.

I will be sharing some projects I am working on later this week. I look forward to getting back in contact with all my great friends!!

Happy crafting and stay healthy and warm.

1 comments:

michael said...

These are great information about Mono symptoms. It is very important to keep yourself healthy all the time.

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Mother of two boys, military wife, and woman extraordinaire. This revamped blog is just thoughts and tidbits from my head on an occasional basis. Sometimes crafty, sometimes intelligent, and sometimes just plain funny. Friends, family, fun.

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